who is phylicia rashad dating now - Cvs remove sticky tag without updating

You can get a copy of the latest revision of the main trunk to work on with the command This creates a working directory called my_module, and it contains the files and subdirectories of my_module.

After you make your changes, you enter them into a new revision on the main trunk with the command Branches can be added to the repository tree in order to allow different development paths to be tried, or to add parallel development of code to different base versions. You do not need to be in a checked-out working directory to do this.

Branches and tags are very different things, though they appear similar on the outside.

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CVS tags are generally used to record the history of a group of files, as when they apply to a certain version of a software package.

This example should, however, provide a basic understanding to how tags work in CVS.

Getting the older version of the file is simple, but it is a little tricky to then use the old version as a starting point for new edits. This tag can get in the way of either committing the old version with new edits or going back to the most up to date version.

To decide which old version of the file you want - look at the cvs log entries: % cvs status oldfile =================================================================== File: oldfile Status: Locally Modified Working revision: 1.5 Repository revision: 1.5 /cvsroot/examples/oldfile,v Sticky Tag: 1.5 Sticky Date: (none) Sticky Options: (none) =================================================================== If you now edit this file and try to commit the edits (ie commit version 1.6), the commit will fail. More pernicious, CVS will not update the file with a normal "cvs update" command because it will look at the sticky tag and assume you want the file to be at version 1.5.

RCS file: /var/lib/cvsrepos/Project X/new_stuff/a.txt,v done Checking in a.txt; /var/lib/cvsrepos/Project X/new_stuff/a.txt,v % cvs co Project X cvs checkout: Updating Project X U Project X/File1U Project X/File2U Project X/File3cvs checkout: Updating Project X/new_stuff U Project X/new_stuff/U Project X/new_stuff/U Project X/new_stuff/c.txt% cvs co Project X cvs checkout: Updating Project X U Project X/File1U Project X/File2U Project X/File3U Project X/File4U Project X/File5.c cvs checkout: Updating Project X/documents U Project X/documents/Test cvs checkout: Updating Project X/new_stuff U Project X/new_stuff/U Project X/new_stuff/U Project X/new_stuff/cvs checkout: Updating Project X/new_stuff2 % cd Project X Let's start this example by tagging only one file.

In most cases, this will not be what you will be doing when tagging files in CVS.

The main concepts that are addressed in this document are: As code gets modified and is committed back to the repository, it adds another revision to extend the tree.

If no branches are specified when checking out working directories, the tree simply grows in a line along the main trunk of the tree.

This creates a working directory with the code as it was when the tag was created.

While branch names refer to the latest code at the end of a branch (and as such, are dynamic), tag names refer to the static version of code that existed upon the tag's creation.

If you want to go back to the most up to date version just do the following: The -A tag tells update to get rid of the sticky tag and do a full update of the file.

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